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Condensed Matter > Materials Science

Title: An inversion breaking Weyl semimetal state in the TaAs material class

Abstract: The recent discoveries of Dirac fermions in graphene and on the surface of topological insulators have ignited worldwide interest in physics and materials science. A Weyl semimetal is an unusual crystal where electrons also behave as massless quasi-particles but interestingly they are not Dirac fermions. These massless particles, Weyl fermions, were originally considered in massless quantum electrodynamics but have not been observed as a fundamental particle in nature. A Weyl semimetal provides a condensed matter realization of Weyl fermions, leading to unique transport properties with novel device applications. Such a semimetal is also a topologically non-trivial metallic phase of matter extending the classification of topological phases beyond insulators. The signature of a Weyl semimetal in real materials is the existence of unusual Fermi arc surface states, which can be viewed as half of a surface Dirac cone in a topological insulator. Here, we identify the first Weyl semimetal in a class of stoichiometric materials, which break crystalline inversion symmetry, including TaAs, TaP, NbAs and NbP. Our first-principles calculations on TaAs reveal the spin-polarized Weyl cones and Fermi arc surface states in this compound. We also observe pairs of Weyl points with the same chiral charge which project onto the same point in the surface Brillouin zone, giving rise to multiple Fermi arcs connecting to a given Weyl point. Our results show that TaAs is the first topological semimetal identified which does not depend on fine-tuning of chemical composition or magnetic order, greatly facilitating an exploration of Weyl physics in real materials.
Comments: Submitted in November'14
Subjects: Materials Science (cond-mat.mtrl-sci); Mesoscale and Nanoscale Physics (cond-mat.mes-hall)
Journal reference: Huang et.al., Nature Commun. 6:7373 (2015) [November, 2014]
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms8373
Cite as: arXiv:1501.00755 [cond-mat.mtrl-sci]
  (or arXiv:1501.00755v1 [cond-mat.mtrl-sci] for this version)

Submission history

From: M Zahid Hasan [view email]
[v1] Mon, 5 Jan 2015 03:42:43 GMT (2004kb)
[v2] Sun, 19 Jul 2015 23:08:16 GMT (2004kb)

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