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Condensed Matter > Statistical Mechanics

Title: Topologically protected modes in non-equilibrium stochastic systems

Abstract: Non-equilibrium driving of biochemical reactions is believed to enable their robust functioning despite the presence of thermal fluctuations and other sources of disorder. Such robust functions include sensory adaptation, enhanced enyzmatic specificity and maintenance of coherent oscillations. Non-equilibrium biochemical reactions can be modeled as a master equation whose rate constants break detailed balance. We find that non equilibrium fluxes can support topologically protected boundary modes that resemble similar modes in electronic and mechanical systems. We show that when a biochemical network can be decomposed into two ordered bulks that meet at a possibly disordered interferace, the ordered bulks can be each associated with a topologically invariant winding number. If the winding numbers are mismatched, we are guaranteed that the steady state distribution is localized at the interface between the bulks, even in the presence of strong disorder in reaction rates. We argue that our work provides a framework for how biochemical systems can use non equilibrium driving to achieve robust function.
Subjects: Statistical Mechanics (cond-mat.stat-mech); Soft Condensed Matter (cond-mat.soft); Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph)
Journal reference: Nature Communications, 8, 13881 (2017)
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms13881
Cite as: arXiv:1605.08407 [cond-mat.stat-mech]
  (or arXiv:1605.08407v1 [cond-mat.stat-mech] for this version)

Submission history

From: Suriyanarayanan Vaikuntanathan [view email]
[v1] Thu, 26 May 2016 19:04:37 GMT (4650kb,D)

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