We gratefully acknowledge support from
the Simons Foundation and member institutions.
Full-text links:

Download:

Current browse context:

physics.data-an

Change to browse by:

References & Citations

Bookmark

(what is this?)
CiteULike logo BibSonomy logo Mendeley logo del.icio.us logo Digg logo Reddit logo ScienceWISE logo

Quantitative Biology > Biomolecules

Title: Prediction of allosteric sites and mediating interactions through bond-to-bond propensities

Abstract: Allosteric regulation is central to many biochemical processes. Allosteric sites provide a target to fine-tune protein activity, yet we lack computational methods to predict them. Here, we present an efficient graph-theoretical approach for identifying allosteric sites and the mediating interactions that connect them to the active site. Using an atomistic graph with edges weighted by covalent and non-covalent bond energies, we obtain a bond-to-bond propensity that quantifies the effect of instantaneous bond fluctuations propagating through the protein. We use this propensity to detect the sites and communication pathways most strongly linked to the active site, assessing their significance through quantile regression and comparison against a reference set of 100 generic proteins. We exemplify our method in detail with three well-studied allosteric proteins: caspase-1, CheY, and h-Ras, correctly predicting the location of the allosteric site and identifying key allosteric interactions. Consistent prediction of allosteric sites is then attained in a further set of 17 proteins known to exhibit allostery. Because our propensity measure runs in almost linear time, it offers a scalable approach to high-throughput searches for candidate allosteric sites.
Comments: 30 pages, including 17 pages main text + 13 pages supplementary information. 7 Figures and 3 tables (main) + 5 Figures and 6 tables (supplementary)
Subjects: Biomolecules (q-bio.BM); Biological Physics (physics.bio-ph); Data Analysis, Statistics and Probability (physics.data-an); Quantitative Methods (q-bio.QM)
Journal reference: Nature Communications 7, Article number: 12477 (2016)
DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12477
Cite as: arXiv:1605.09710 [q-bio.BM]
  (or arXiv:1605.09710v1 [q-bio.BM] for this version)

Submission history

From: Michael Schaub [view email]
[v1] Tue, 31 May 2016 16:56:23 GMT (4318kb,D)

Link back to: arXiv, form interface, contact.