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Astrophysics > Earth and Planetary Astrophysics

Title: Tracking Dust Grains During Transport and Growth in Protoplanetary Disks

Abstract: Protoplanetary disks are dynamic objects, within which dust grains and gas are expected to be redistributed over large distances. Evidence for this redistribution is seen both in other protoplanetary disks and in our own Solar System, with high-temperature materials thought to originate close to the central star found in the cold, outer regions of the disks. While models have shown this redistribution is possible through a variety of mechanisms, these models have generally ignored the possible growth of solids via grain-grain collisions that would occur during transit. Here we investigate the interplay of coagulation and radial and vertical transport of solids in protoplanetary disks, considering cases where growth is limited by bouncing or by fragmentation. We find that in all cases, growth effectively limits the ability for materials to be carried outward or preserved at large distances from the star. This is due to solids being incorporated into large aggregates which drift inwards rapidly under the effects of gas drag. We discuss the implications for mixing in protoplanetary disks, and how the preservation of high temperature materials in outer disks may require structures or outward flow patterns to avoid them being lost via radial drift.
Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures, 1 table, accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal
Subjects: Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP)
Journal reference: Astrophysical Journal (2019) 885:118
DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab4a13
Cite as: arXiv:1910.00609 [astro-ph.EP]
  (or arXiv:1910.00609v1 [astro-ph.EP] for this version)

Submission history

From: William Misener [view email]
[v1] Tue, 1 Oct 2019 18:28:46 GMT (5444kb,D)

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