We gratefully acknowledge support from
the Simons Foundation and member institutions.
Full-text links:

Download:

Current browse context:

physics.soc-ph

Change to browse by:

References & Citations

Bookmark

(what is this?)
CiteULike logo BibSonomy logo Mendeley logo del.icio.us logo Digg logo Reddit logo ScienceWISE logo

Computer Science > Social and Information Networks

Title: How mobility patterns drive disease spread: A case study using public transit passenger card travel data

Authors: Ahmad El Shoghri (1 and 2), Jessica Liebig (2), Lauren Gardner (3 and 4), Raja Jurdak (2), Salil Kanhere (1) ((1) School of Computer Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AUSTRALIA, (2) Data61, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, Brisbane, AUSTRALIA, (3) School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, (4) Department of Civil Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA)
Abstract: Outbreaks of infectious diseases present a global threat to human health and are considered a major health-care challenge. One major driver for the rapid spatial spread of diseases is human mobility. In particular, the travel patterns of individuals determine their spreading potential to a great extent. These travel behaviors can be captured and modelled using novel location-based data sources, e.g., smart travel cards, social media, etc. Previous studies have shown that individuals who cannot be characterized by their most frequently visited locations spread diseases farther and faster; however, these studies are based on GPS data and mobile call records which have position uncertainty and do not capture explicit contacts. It is unclear if the same conclusions hold for large scale real-world transport networks. In this paper, we investigate how mobility patterns impact disease spread in a large-scale public transit network of empirical data traces. In contrast to previous findings, our results reveal that individuals with mobility patterns characterized by their most frequently visited locations and who typically travel large distances pose the highest spreading risk.
Comments: 6 Pages, 8 figures and 2 tables. Published in: 2019 IEEE 20th International Symposium on "A World of Wireless, Mobile and Multimedia Networks" (WoWMoM)
Subjects: Social and Information Networks (cs.SI); Physics and Society (physics.soc-ph); Populations and Evolution (q-bio.PE)
Journal reference: 2019 IEEE 20th International Symposium on "A World of Wireless, Mobile and Multimedia Networks" (WoWMoM), Washington, DC, USA, 2019, pp. 1-6
DOI: 10.1109/WoWMoM.2019.8793018
Cite as: arXiv:2004.01466 [cs.SI]
  (or arXiv:2004.01466v1 [cs.SI] for this version)

Submission history

From: Ahmad El Shoghri [view email]
[v1] Fri, 3 Apr 2020 10:52:49 GMT (474kb,D)

Link back to: arXiv, form interface, contact.