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Multiagent Systems

New submissions

[ total of 3 entries: 1-3 ]
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New submissions for Fri, 1 Jul 22

[1]  arXiv:2206.14893 [pdf, other]
Title: Breaking indecision in multi-agent, multi-option dynamics
Comments: 36 pages
Subjects: Dynamical Systems (math.DS); Multiagent Systems (cs.MA); Social and Information Networks (cs.SI); Optimization and Control (math.OC)

How does a group of agents break indecision when deciding about options with qualities that are hard to distinguish? Biological and artificial multi-agent systems, from honeybees and bird flocks to bacteria, robots, and humans, often need to overcome indecision when choosing among options in situations in which the performance or even the survival of the group are at stake. Breaking indecision is also important because in a fully indecisive state agents are not biased toward any specific option and therefore the agent group is maximally sensitive and prone to adapt to inputs and changes in its environment. Here, we develop a mathematical theory to study how decisions arise from the breaking of indecision. Our approach is grounded in both equivariant and network bifurcation theory. We model decision from indecision as synchrony-breaking in influence networks in which each node is the value assigned by an agent to an option. First, we show that three universal decision behaviors, namely, deadlock, consensus, and dissensus, are the generic outcomes of synchrony-breaking bifurcations from a fully synchronous state of indecision in influence networks. Second, we show that all deadlock and consensus value patterns and some dissensus value patterns are predicted by the symmetry of the influence networks. Third, we show that there are also many `exotic' dissensus value patterns. These patterns are predicted by network architecture, but not by network symmetries, through a new synchrony-breaking branching lemma. This is the first example of exotic solutions in an application. Numerical simulations of a novel influence network model illustrate our theoretical results.

[2]  arXiv:2206.14990 [pdf, other]
Title: Bridging Mean-Field Games and Normalizing Flows with Trajectory Regularization
Comments: 36 pages, 22 figures, 9 tables
Subjects: Optimization and Control (math.OC); Machine Learning (cs.LG); Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

Mean-field games (MFGs) are a modeling framework for systems with a large number of interacting agents. They have applications in economics, finance, and game theory. Normalizing flows (NFs) are a family of deep generative models that compute data likelihoods by using an invertible mapping, which is typically parameterized by using neural networks. They are useful for density modeling and data generation. While active research has been conducted on both models, few noted the relationship between the two. In this work, we unravel the connections between MFGs and NFs by contextualizing the training of an NF as solving the MFG. This is achieved by reformulating the MFG problem in terms of agent trajectories and parameterizing a discretization of the resulting MFG with flow architectures. With this connection, we explore two research directions. First, we employ expressive NF architectures to accurately solve high-dimensional MFGs, sidestepping the curse of dimensionality in traditional numerical methods. Compared with other deep learning approaches, our trajectory-based formulation encodes the continuity equation in the neural network, resulting in a better approximation of the population dynamics. Second, we regularize the training of NFs with transport costs and show the effectiveness on controlling the model's Lipschitz bound, resulting in better generalization performance. We demonstrate numerical results through comprehensive experiments on a variety of synthetic and real-life datasets.

[3]  arXiv:2206.15378 [pdf, other]
Title: Mastering the Game of Stratego with Model-Free Multiagent Reinforcement Learning
Subjects: Artificial Intelligence (cs.AI); Computer Science and Game Theory (cs.GT); Multiagent Systems (cs.MA)

We introduce DeepNash, an autonomous agent capable of learning to play the imperfect information game Stratego from scratch, up to a human expert level. Stratego is one of the few iconic board games that Artificial Intelligence (AI) has not yet mastered. This popular game has an enormous game tree on the order of $10^{535}$ nodes, i.e., $10^{175}$ times larger than that of Go. It has the additional complexity of requiring decision-making under imperfect information, similar to Texas hold'em poker, which has a significantly smaller game tree (on the order of $10^{164}$ nodes). Decisions in Stratego are made over a large number of discrete actions with no obvious link between action and outcome. Episodes are long, with often hundreds of moves before a player wins, and situations in Stratego can not easily be broken down into manageably-sized sub-problems as in poker. For these reasons, Stratego has been a grand challenge for the field of AI for decades, and existing AI methods barely reach an amateur level of play. DeepNash uses a game-theoretic, model-free deep reinforcement learning method, without search, that learns to master Stratego via self-play. The Regularised Nash Dynamics (R-NaD) algorithm, a key component of DeepNash, converges to an approximate Nash equilibrium, instead of 'cycling' around it, by directly modifying the underlying multi-agent learning dynamics. DeepNash beats existing state-of-the-art AI methods in Stratego and achieved a yearly (2022) and all-time top-3 rank on the Gravon games platform, competing with human expert players.

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