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Econometrics

New submissions

[ total of 6 entries: 1-6 ]
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New submissions for Fri, 29 May 20

[1]  arXiv:2005.14057 [pdf, other]
Title: Machine learning time series regressions with an application to nowcasting
Comments: 25 pages, plus appendix. Portions of this work previously appeared as arXiv:1912.06307v1 which has been split into two articles
Subjects: Econometrics (econ.EM); Applications (stat.AP); Methodology (stat.ME); Machine Learning (stat.ML)

This paper introduces structured machine learning regressions for high-dimensional time series data potentially sampled at different frequencies. The sparse-group LASSO estimator can take advantage of such time series data structures and outperforms the unstructured LASSO. We establish oracle inequalities for the sparse-group LASSO estimator within a framework that allows for the mixing processes and recognizes that the financial and the macroeconomic data may have heavier than exponential tails. An empirical application to nowcasting US GDP growth indicates that the estimator performs favorably compared to other alternatives and that the text data can be a useful addition to more traditional numerical data.

[2]  arXiv:2005.14168 [pdf, other]
Title: Causal Impact of Masks, Policies, Behavior on Early Covid-19 Pandemic in the U.S
Subjects: Econometrics (econ.EM); Applications (stat.AP)

This paper evaluates the dynamic impact of various policies, such as school, business, and restaurant closures, adopted by the US states on the growth rates of confirmed Covid-19 cases and social distancing behavior measured by Google Mobility Reports, where we take into consideration of people's voluntarily behavioral response to new information of transmission risks. Using the US state-level data, our analysis finds that both policies and information on transmission risks are important determinants of people's social distancing behavior, and shows that a change in policies explains a large fraction of observed changes in social distancing behavior. Our counterfactual experiments indicate that removing all policies would have lead to 30 to 200 times more additional cases by late May. Removing only the non-essential businesses closures (while maintaining restrictions on movie theaters and restaurants) would have increased the weekly growth rate of cases between -0.02 and 0.06 and would have lead to -10% to 40% more cases by late May. Finally, nationally mandating face masks for employees on April 1st would have reduced the case growth rate by 0.1-0.25. This leads to 30% to 57% fewer reported cases by late May, which translates into, roughly, 30-57 thousand saved lives.

Cross-lists for Fri, 29 May 20

[3]  arXiv:2005.13596 (cross-list from stat.ML) [pdf, other]
Title: Breiman's "Two Cultures" Revisited and Reconciled
Comments: This paper celebrates the 70th anniversary of Statistical Machine Learning--- how far we've come, and how far we have to go. Keywords: Integrated statistical learning theory, Exploratory machine learning, Uncertainty prediction machine, ML-powered modern applied statistics, Information theory
Subjects: Machine Learning (stat.ML); Artificial Intelligence (cs.AI); Machine Learning (cs.LG); Econometrics (econ.EM); Methodology (stat.ME)

In a landmark paper published in 2001, Leo Breiman described the tense standoff between two cultures of data modeling: parametric statistical and algorithmic machine learning. The cultural division between these two statistical learning frameworks has been growing at a steady pace in recent years. What is the way forward? It has become blatantly obvious that this widening gap between "the two cultures" cannot be averted unless we find a way to blend them into a coherent whole. This article presents a solution by establishing a link between the two cultures. Through examples, we describe the challenges and potential gains of this new integrated statistical thinking.

Replacements for Fri, 29 May 20

[4]  arXiv:1808.01398 (replaced) [pdf, other]
Title: Coverage Error Optimal Confidence Intervals for Local Polynomial Regression
Subjects: Econometrics (econ.EM); Statistics Theory (math.ST)
[5]  arXiv:1811.08083 (replaced) [pdf, other]
Title: Complete Subset Averaging with Many Instruments
Comments: 58 pages, 5 figures, 10 tables
Subjects: Econometrics (econ.EM); Methodology (stat.ME)
[6]  arXiv:2001.06281 (replaced) [pdf, other]
Title: Entropy Balancing for Continuous Treatments
Authors: Stefan Tübbicke
Subjects: Econometrics (econ.EM); Methodology (stat.ME)
[ total of 6 entries: 1-6 ]
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