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Computer Science > Emerging Technologies

Title: Particle Computation: Complexity, Algorithms, and Logic

Abstract: We investigate algorithmic control of a large swarm of mobile particles (such as robots, sensors, or building material) that move in a 2D workspace using a global input signal (such as gravity or a magnetic field). We show that a maze of obstacles to the environment can be used to create complex systems. We provide a wide range of results for a wide range of questions. These can be subdivided into external algorithmic problems, in which particle configurations serve as input for computations that are performed elsewhere, and internal logic problems, in which the particle configurations themselves are used for carrying out computations. For external algorithms, we give both negative and positive results. If we are given a set of stationary obstacles, we prove that it is NP-hard to decide whether a given initial configuration of unit-sized particles can be transformed into a desired target configuration. Moreover, we show that finding a control sequence of minimum length is PSPACE-complete. We also work on the inverse problem, providing constructive algorithms to design workspaces that efficiently implement arbitrary permutations between different configurations. For internal logic, we investigate how arbitrary computations can be implemented. We demonstrate how to encode dual-rail logic to build a universal logic gate that concurrently evaluates and, nand, nor, and or operations. Using many of these gates and appropriate interconnects, we can evaluate any logical expression. However, we establish that simulating the full range of complex interactions present in arbitrary digital circuits encounters a fundamental difficulty: a fan-out gate cannot be generated. We resolve this missing component with the help of 2x1 particles, which can create fan-out gates that produce multiple copies of the inputs. Using these gates we provide rules for replicating arbitrary digital circuits.
Comments: 27 pages, 19 figures, full version that combines three previous conference articles
Subjects: Emerging Technologies (cs.ET); Computational Geometry (cs.CG); Distributed, Parallel, and Cluster Computing (cs.DC); Data Structures and Algorithms (cs.DS); Robotics (cs.RO)
Cite as: arXiv:1712.01197 [cs.ET]
  (or arXiv:1712.01197v1 [cs.ET] for this version)

Submission history

From: Sandor P. Fekete [view email]
[v1] Mon, 4 Dec 2017 17:03:10 GMT (3815kb,D)

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