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Quantitative Biology > Populations and Evolution

Title: Decentralized physiology and the molecular basis of social life in eusocial insects

Abstract: The traditional focus of physiological and functional genomic research is on molecular processes that play out within a single body. In contrast, when social interactions occur, molecular and behavioral responses in interacting individuals can lead to physiological processes that are distributed across multiple individuals. In eusocial insect colonies, such multi-body processes are tightly integrated, involving social communication mechanisms that regulate the physiology of colony members. As a result, conserved physiological mechanisms, for example related to pheromone detection and neural signaling pathways, are deployed in novel contexts and regulate emergent colony traits during the evolutionary origin and elaboration of social complexity. Here we review conceptual frameworks for organismal and colony physiology, and highlight functional genomic, physiological, and behavioral research exploring how colony-level traits arise from physical and chemical interactions among nestmates. We highlight mechanistic work exploring how colony traits arise from physical and chemical interactions among physiologically-specialized nestmates of various developmental stages. We consider similarities and differences between organismal and colony physiology, and make specific predictions based on a decentralized perspective on the function and evolution of colony traits. Integrated models of colony physiological function will be useful to address fundamental questions related to the evolution and ecology of collective behavior in natural systems.
Comments: 32 pages, 1 Figure
Subjects: Populations and Evolution (q-bio.PE); Tissues and Organs (q-bio.TO)
Cite as: arXiv:1911.01321 [q-bio.PE]
  (or arXiv:1911.01321v1 [q-bio.PE] for this version)

Submission history

From: Daniel Friedman [view email]
[v1] Mon, 4 Nov 2019 16:32:09 GMT (522kb)

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