We gratefully acknowledge support from
the Simons Foundation and member institutions.
Full-text links:

Download:

Current browse context:

cs.SD

Change to browse by:

References & Citations

DBLP - CS Bibliography

Bookmark

(what is this?)
CiteULike logo BibSonomy logo Mendeley logo del.icio.us logo Digg logo Reddit logo ScienceWISE logo

Computer Science > Sound

Title: Adaptive music: Automated music composition and distribution

Abstract: Creativity, or the ability to produce new useful ideas, is commonly associated to the human being; but there are many other examples in nature where this phenomenon can be observed. Inspired by this fact, in engineering and particularly in computational sciences, many different models have been developed to tackle a number of problems.
Composing music, a form of art broadly present along the human history, is the main topic addressed in this thesis. Taking advantage of the kind of ideas that bring diversity and creativity to nature and computation, we present Melomics: an algorithmic composition method based on evolutionary search. The solutions have a genetic encoding based on formal grammars and these are interpreted in a complex developmental process followed by a fitness assessment, to produce valid music compositions in standard formats.
The system has exhibited a high creative power and versatility to produce music of different types and it has been tested, proving on many occasions the outcome to be indistinguishable from the music made by human composers. The system has also enabled the emergence of a set of completely novel applications: from effective tools to help anyone to easily obtain the precise music that they need, to radically new uses, such as adaptive music for therapy, exercise, amusement and many others. It seems clear that automated composition is an active research area and that countless new uses will be discovered.
Comments: 218 pages, 49 figures, 22 tables, 38 audio samples. Doctoral Thesis. Universidad de M\'alaga, 2021. this https URL
Subjects: Sound (cs.SD); Computers and Society (cs.CY); Neural and Evolutionary Computing (cs.NE); Audio and Speech Processing (eess.AS)
Cite as: arXiv:2008.04415 [cs.SD]
  (or arXiv:2008.04415v2 [cs.SD] for this version)

Submission history

From: David Daniel Albarracín Molina [view email]
[v1] Sat, 25 Jul 2020 09:38:06 GMT (4672kb)
[v2] Tue, 25 Jan 2022 11:14:00 GMT (3790kb)

Link back to: arXiv, form interface, contact.