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Astrophysics > Earth and Planetary Astrophysics

Title: Alkali metals in white dwarf atmospheres as tracers of ancient planetary crusts

Abstract: White dwarfs that accrete the debris of tidally disrupted asteroids provide the opportunity to measure the bulk composition of the building blocks, or fragments, of exoplanets. This technique has established a diversity in compositions comparable to what is observed in the solar system, suggesting that the formation of rocky planets is a generic process. Whereas the relative abundances of lithophile and siderophile elements within the planetary debris can be used to investigate whether exoplanets undergo differentiation, the composition studies carried out so far lack unambiguous tracers of planetary crusts. Here we report the detection of lithium in the atmospheres of four cool (<5,000 K) and old (cooling ages 5-10 Gyr) metal-polluted white dwarfs, where one also displays photospheric potassium. The relative abundances of these two elements with respect to sodium and calcium strongly suggest that all four white dwarfs have accreted fragments of planetary crusts. We detect an infrared excess in one of the systems, indicating that accretion from a circumstellar debris disk is on-going. The main-sequence progenitor mass of this star was $4.8\pm0.2 M_\odot$, demonstrating that rocky, differentiated planets may form around short-lived B-type stars.
Comments: Published in Nature Astronomy Letters on February 11th 2021, this https URL
Subjects: Earth and Planetary Astrophysics (astro-ph.EP); Solar and Stellar Astrophysics (astro-ph.SR)
DOI: 10.1038/s41550-020-01296-7
Cite as: arXiv:2101.01225 [astro-ph.EP]
  (or arXiv:2101.01225v2 [astro-ph.EP] for this version)

Submission history

From: Mark Hollands [view email]
[v1] Mon, 4 Jan 2021 20:20:55 GMT (933kb,D)
[v2] Fri, 12 Feb 2021 16:55:50 GMT (938kb,D)

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