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Physics > Optics

Title: FDMA-CDMA Mode CAOS Camera Demonstration using UV to NIR Full Spectrum

Abstract: For the first time, the hybrid Frequency Division Multiple Access (FDMA) Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) mode of the CAOS (i.e., Coded Access Optical Sensor) camera is demonstrated. The FDMA CDMA mode is a time frequency double signal encoding design for robust and faster linear High Dynamic Range (HDR) image irradiance extraction. Specifically, it simultaneously combines the strength of the FDMA-mode linear HDR Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) Digital Signal Processing (DSP) based spectrum analysis with the CDMA mode provided many simultaneous CAOS pixels high Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) photo-detection. The FDMA CDMA mode with P FDMA channels provides a faster camera operation versus the linear HDR Frequency Modulation (FM) CDMA mode. Visible band imaging experiments using a Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) based CAOS camera demonstrate a P equal to 4 channels FDMA CDMA mode high quality image recovery of a calibrated 64 dB 6 patches HDR target versus the CDMA and FM CDMA CAOS modes that limit dynamic range and speed, respectively. Simultaneous dual image capture capability of the FDMA-CDMA mode is also demonstrated for the first time in Ultraviolet (UV) to Near Infrared (NIR) 350 to 1800 nm full spectrum using Silicon (Si) and Germanium (Ge) point photo-detectors.
Comments: 4 pages
Subjects: Optics (physics.optics); Image and Video Processing (eess.IV)
Cite as: arXiv:2101.02061 [physics.optics]
  (or arXiv:2101.02061v1 [physics.optics] for this version)

Submission history

From: Nabeel Riza [view email]
[v1] Wed, 6 Jan 2021 14:28:42 GMT (380kb)

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