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Computer Science > Computers and Society

Title: Remote Collaboration Fuses Fewer Breakthrough Ideas

Abstract: Scientists and inventors around the world are more plentiful and interconnected today than ever before. But while there are more people making discoveries, and more ideas that can be reconfigured in novel ways, research suggests that new ideas are getting harder to find-contradicting recombinant growth theory. In this paper, we shed new light on this apparent puzzle. Analyzing 20 million research articles and 4 million patent applications across the globe over the past half-century, we begin by documenting the rise of remote collaboration across locations, underlining the growing interconnectedness of scientists and inventors globally. However, we also show that for all fields, periods, and team sizes, researchers in these distributed teams are consistently less likely to make breakthrough discoveries relative to their onsite counterparts. Using a novel dataset that allows us to explore the division of labor within each team, we find that distributed team members tend to collaborate in technical tasks-like collecting and analyzing data-but are less likely to join forces in conceptual tasks, such as conceiving new ideas and designing research. Hence, while remote teams collaborate in theory, actual cooperation centers on late-stage, technical project tasks, involving more codified knowledge. We conclude that despite striking improvements in remote work technology in recent years, remote teams are less likely to integrate existing knowledge to produce new, disruptive ideas. This also provides an explanation for why new ideas are getting harder to find.
Subjects: Computers and Society (cs.CY); General Economics (econ.GN)
Cite as: arXiv:2206.01878 [cs.CY]
  (or arXiv:2206.01878v2 [cs.CY] for this version)

Submission history

From: Yiling Lin [view email]
[v1] Sat, 4 Jun 2022 02:19:25 GMT (3388kb)
[v2] Tue, 7 Jun 2022 12:18:28 GMT (4247kb)

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