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Computer Science > Computers and Society

Title: Don't "research fast and break things": On the ethics of Computational Social Science

Authors: David Leslie
Abstract: This article is concerned with setting up practical guardrails within the research activities and environments of CSS. It aims to provide CSS scholars, as well as policymakers and other stakeholders who apply CSS methods, with the critical and constructive means needed to ensure that their practices are ethical, trustworthy, and responsible. It begins by providing a taxonomy of the ethical challenges faced by researchers in the field of CSS. These are challenges related to (1) the treatment of research subjects, (2) the impacts of CSS research on affected individuals and communities, (3) the quality of CSS research and to its epistemological status, (4) research integrity, and (5) research equity. Taking these challenges as a motivation for cultural transformation, it then argues for the end-to-end incorporation of habits of responsible research and innovation (RRI) into CSS practices, focusing on the role that contextual considerations, anticipatory reflection, impact assessment, public engagement, and justifiable and well-documented action should play across the research lifecycle. In proposing the inclusion of habits of RRI in CSS practices, the chapter lays out several practical steps needed for ethical, trustworthy, and responsible CSS research activities. These include stakeholder engagement processes, research impact assessments, data lifecycle documentation, bias self-assessments, and transparent research reporting protocols.
Subjects: Computers and Society (cs.CY); Computation and Language (cs.CL); Computer Science and Game Theory (cs.GT); Machine Learning (cs.LG); Social and Information Networks (cs.SI)
DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.6635569
Cite as: arXiv:2206.06370 [cs.CY]
  (or arXiv:2206.06370v1 [cs.CY] for this version)

Submission history

From: David Leslie [view email]
[v1] Sun, 12 Jun 2022 09:51:19 GMT (2068kb)

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