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Quantitative Finance

New submissions

[ total of 21 entries: 1-21 ]
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New submissions for Tue, 19 Oct 21

[1]  arXiv:2110.08320 [pdf, ps, other]
Title: Semimartingale and continuous-time Markov chain approximation for rough stochastic local volatility models
Comments: 27 pages
Subjects: Mathematical Finance (q-fin.MF); Computational Finance (q-fin.CP)

Rough volatility models have recently been empirically shown to provide a good fit to historical volatility time series and implied volatility smiles of SPX options. They are continuous-time stochastic volatility models, whose volatility process is driven by a fractional Brownian motion with Hurst parameter less than half. Due to the challenge that it is neither a semimartingale nor a Markov process, there is no unified method that not only applies to all rough volatility models, but also is computationally efficient. This paper proposes a semimartingale and continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) approximation approach for the general class of rough stochastic local volatility (RSLV) models. In particular, we introduce the perturbed stochastic local volatility (PSLV) model as the semimartingale approximation for the RSLV model and establish its existence , uniqueness and Markovian representation. We propose a fast CTMC algorithm and prove its weak convergence. Numerical experiments demonstrate the accuracy and high efficiency of the method in pricing European, barrier and American options. Comparing with existing literature, a significant reduction in the CPU time to arrive at the same level of accuracy is observed.

[2]  arXiv:2110.08367 [pdf, other]
Title: Dropping diversity of products of large US firms: Models and measures
Subjects: Statistical Finance (q-fin.ST); Machine Learning (cs.LG)

It is widely assumed that in our lifetimes the products available in the global economy have become more diverse. This assumption is difficult to investigate directly, however, because it is difficult to collect the necessary data about every product in an economy each year. We solve this problem by mining publicly available textual descriptions of the products of every large US firms each year from 1997 to 2017. Although many aspects of economic productivity have been steadily rising during this period, our text-based measurements show that the diversity of the products of at least large US firms has steadily declined. This downward trend is visible using a variety of product diversity metrics, including some that depend on a measurement of the similarity of the products of every single pair of firms. The current state of the art in comprehensive and detailed firm-similarity measurements is a Boolean word vector model due to Hoberg and Phillips. We measure diversity using firm-similarities from this Boolean model and two more sophisticated variants, and we consistently observe a significant dropping trend in product diversity. These results make it possible to frame and start to test specific hypotheses for explaining the dropping product diversity trend.

[3]  arXiv:2110.08612 [pdf, other]
Title: The elastic origins of tail asymmetry
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)

Based on a multisector general equilibrium framework, we show that the sectoral elasticity of substitution plays the key role in the evolution of robustness and the asymmetric tails in the aggregate macroeconomic fluctuations. Non-unitary elasticity of substitution of the production networks renders a nonlinear Domar aggregation where normal sectoral productivity shocks translates into a non-normal aggregated shocks. We estimate 100 sectoral elasticities of substitution, using the time-series linked input-output tables for Japan, and find that the production economy is elastic overall. Along with the vested assessment of an inelastic production economy for the US, the contrasting tail asymmetry of the distribution of aggregated shocks between the US and Japan is explored.

[4]  arXiv:2110.08630 [pdf, ps, other]
Title: Star-shaped acceptability indexes
Subjects: Risk Management (q-fin.RM)

We propose the star-shaped acceptability indexes as generalizations of both the approaches of Cherny and Madan (2009) and Rosazza Gianin and Sgarra (2013) in the same vein as star-shaped risk measures generalize both the classes of coherent and convex risk measures. We characterize acceptability indexes through star-shaped risk measures, star-shaped acceptance sets, and as the minimum of some family of quasi-concave acceptability indexes. Further, we introduce concrete examples under our approach linked to Value at Risk, risk-adjusted reward on capital, reward-based gain-loss ratio, monotone reward-deviation ratio, and robust acceptability indexes. We also expose an application regarding optimization of performance.

[5]  arXiv:2110.08723 [pdf]
Title: Gender identity and relative income within household: Evidence from China
Comments: This is a paper written by three high school students living in Singapore. We look forward to valuable comments and suggestions to improve the paper
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)

How does women's obedience to traditional gender roles affect their labour outcomes? To investigate on this question, we employ discontinuity tests and fixed effect regressions with time lag to measure how married women in China diminish their labour outcomes so as to maintain the bread-winning status of their husbands. In the first half of this research, our discontinuity test exhibits a missing mass of married women who just out-earn their husbands, which is interpreted as an evidence showing that these females diminish their earnings under the influence of gender norms. In the second half, we use fixed effect regressions with time lag to assess the change of a female's future labour outcomes if she currently earns more than her husband. Our results suggest that women's future labour participation decisions (whether they still join the workforce) are unaffected, but their yearly incomes and weekly working hours will be reduced in the future. Lastly, heterogeneous studies are conducted, showing that low-income and less educated married women are more susceptible to the influence of gender norms.

[6]  arXiv:2110.08807 [pdf, other]
Title: Estimating returns to special education: combining machine learning and text analysis to address confounding
Authors: Aurélien Sallin
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)

While the number of students with identified special needs is increasing in developed countries, there is little evidence on academic outcomes and labor market integration returns to special education. I present results from the first ever study to examine short- and long-term returns to special education programs using recent methods in causal machine learning and computational text analysis. I find that special education programs in inclusive settings have positive returns on academic performance in math and language as well as on employment and wages. Moreover, I uncover a positive effect of inclusive special education programs in comparison to segregated programs. However, I find that segregation has benefits for some students: students with emotional or behavioral problems, and nonnative students. Finally, using shallow decision trees, I deliver optimal placement rules that increase overall returns for students with special needs and lower special education costs. These placement rules would reallocate most students with special needs from segregation to inclusion, which reinforces the conclusion that inclusion is beneficial to students with special needs.

[7]  arXiv:2110.08900 [pdf, other]
Title: Predictable Forward Performance Processes: Infrequent Evaluation and Robo-Advising Applications
Subjects: Mathematical Finance (q-fin.MF)

We study discrete-time predictable forward processes when trading times do not coincide with performance evaluation times in the binomial tree model for the financial market. The key step in the construction of these processes is to solve a linear functional equation of higher order associated with the inverse problem driving the evolution of the predictable forward process. We provide sufficient conditions for the existence and uniqueness and an explicit construction of the predictable forward process under these conditions. Furthermore, we show that these processes are time-monotone in the evaluation period. Finally, we argue that predictable forward preferences are a viable framework to model preferences for robo-advising applications and determine an optimal interaction schedule between client and robo-advisor that balances a tradeoff between increasing uncertainty about the client's beliefs on the financial market and an interaction cost.

[8]  arXiv:2110.09098 [pdf]
Title: Study of The Relationship Between Public and Private Venture Capitalists in France: A Qualitative Approach
Authors: Jonathan Labbe (CEREFIGE)
Comments: 3rd International Conference on Digital, Innovation, Entrepreneurship & Financing., Oct 2021, Lyon, France
Subjects: General Finance (q-fin.GN)

This research focuses on the study of relationships between public and private equity investors in France. In this regard, we need to apprehend the formal or informal nature of interactions that can sometimes take place within traditional innovation networks (Djellal \& Gallouj, 2018). For this, our article mobilizes a public-private partnerships approach (PPPs) and the resource-based view theory. These perspectives emphasize the complementary role of disciplinary and incentive mechanisms as well as the exchange of specific resources as levers for value creation. Moreover, these orientations crossed with the perspective of a hybrid form of co-investment allow us to build a coherent and explanatory framework of the mixed syndication phenomenon. Our methodology is based on a qualitative approach with an interpretative aim, which includes twenty-seven semi-structured interviews. These data were subjected to a thematic content analysis using Nvivo software. The results suggest that the relationships between public and private Venture capitalists (VCs) of a formal or informal nature, more specifically in a syndication context, at a national or regional level, are representative of an ''economico-cognitive'' (Farrugia, 2014, page 6) approach to networking and innovation. Moreover, the phenomenon of mixed syndication reveals a context of hybridization of public and private actors that would allow the private VCs to benefit from the distribution of wealth when the company develops its innovation. We can also identify a process related to a quest for legitimacy on the part of the public actor characterized by its controlling role within the public-private partnership (Beuve and Saussier, 2019). Finally, our study has some limitations. One example is the measurement of the effects of relationships on ''visible'' or ''invisible'' innovation (Djellal \& Gallouj, 2018, page 90).

[9]  arXiv:2110.09169 [pdf, other]
Title: Prosecutor Politics: The Impact of Election Cycles on Criminal Sentencing in the Era of Rising Incarceration
Authors: Chika O. Okafor
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)

I investigate how political incentives affect the behavior of district attorneys (DAs). I develop a theoretical model that predicts DAs will increase sentencing intensity in an election period compared to the period prior. To empirically test this prediction, I compile one of the most comprehensive datasets to date on the political careers of all district attorneys in office during the steepest rise in incarceration in U.S. history (roughly 1986-2006). Using quasi-experimental methods, I find causal evidence that being in a DA election year increases total admissions per capita and total months sentenced per capita. I estimate that the election year effects on admissions are akin to moving 0.85 standard deviations along the distribution of DA behavior within state (e.g., going from the 50th to 80th percentile in sentencing intensity). I find evidence that election effects are larger (1) when DA elections are contested, (2) in Republican counties, and (3) in the southern United States--all these factors are consistent with the perspective that election effects arise from political incentives influencing DAs. Further, I find that district attorney election effects decline over the period 1986-2006, in tandem with U.S. public opinion softening regarding criminal punishment. These findings suggest DA behavior may respond to voter preferences--in particular to public sentiment regarding the harshness of the court system.

[10]  arXiv:2110.09315 [pdf, other]
Title: Predicting Status of Pre and Post M&A Deals Using Machine Learning and Deep Learning Techniques
Comments: 21 pages
Subjects: General Finance (q-fin.GN); Machine Learning (cs.LG)

Risk arbitrage or merger arbitrage is a well-known investment strategy that speculates on the success of M&A deals. Prediction of the deal status in advance is of great importance for risk arbitrageurs. If a deal is mistakenly classified as a completed deal, then enormous cost can be incurred as a result of investing in target company shares. On the contrary, risk arbitrageurs may lose the opportunity of making profit. In this paper, we present an ML and DL based methodology for takeover success prediction problem. We initially apply various ML techniques for data preprocessing such as kNN for data imputation, PCA for lower dimensional representation of numerical variables, MCA for categorical variables, and LSTM autoencoder for sentiment scores. We experiment with different cost functions, different evaluation metrics, and oversampling techniques to address class imbalance in our dataset. We then implement feedforward neural networks to predict the success of the deal status. Our preliminary results indicate that our methodology outperforms the benchmark models such as logit and weighted logit models. We also integrate sentiment scores into our methodology using different model architectures, but our preliminary results show that the performance is not changing much compared to the simple FFNN framework. We will explore different architectures and employ a thorough hyperparameter tuning for sentiment scores as a future work.

[11]  arXiv:2110.09400 [pdf, other]
Title: Identifying the Effects of Sanctions on the Iranian Economy using Newspaper Coverage
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)

This paper considers how sanctions affected the Iranian economy using a novel measure of sanctions intensity based on daily newspaper coverage. It finds sanctions to have significant effects on exchange rates, inflation, and output growth, with the Iranian rial over-reacting to sanctions, followed up with a rise in inflation and a fall in output. In absence of sanctions, Iran's average annual growth could have been around 4-5 per cent, as compared to the 3 per cent realized. Sanctions are also found to have adverse effects on employment, labor force participation, secondary and high-school education, with such effects amplified for females.

[12]  arXiv:2110.09417 [pdf, ps, other]
Title: Mean-Variance Portfolio Selection in Contagious Markets
Authors: Yang Shen, Bin Zou
Subjects: Mathematical Finance (q-fin.MF); Optimization and Control (math.OC); Portfolio Management (q-fin.PM)

We consider a mean-variance portfolio selection problem in a financial market with contagion risk. The risky assets follow a jump-diffusion model, in which jumps are driven by a multivariate Hawkes process with mutual-excitation effect. The mutual-excitation feature of the Hawkes process captures the contagion risk in the sense that each price jump of an asset increases the likelihood of future jumps not only in the same asset but also in other assets. We apply the stochastic maximum principle, backward stochastic differential equation theory, and linear-quadratic control technique to solve the problem and obtain the efficient strategy and efficient frontier in semi-closed form, subject to a non-local partial differential equation. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate our results.

[13]  arXiv:2110.09429 [pdf, other]
Title: Understanding jumps in high frequency digital asset markets
Subjects: Trading and Market Microstructure (q-fin.TR); Applications (stat.AP)

While attention is a predictor for digital asset prices, and jumps in Bitcoin prices are well-known, we know little about its alternatives. Studying high frequency crypto data gives us the unique possibility to confirm that cross market digital asset returns are driven by high frequency jumps clustered around black swan events, resembling volatility and trading volume seasonalities. Regressions show that intra-day jumps significantly influence end of day returns in size and direction. This provides fundamental research for crypto option pricing models. However, we need better econometric methods for capturing the specific market microstructure of cryptos. All calculations are reproducible via the quantlet.com technology.

[14]  arXiv:2110.09489 [pdf]
Title: Sector Volatility Prediction Performance Using GARCH Models and Artificial Neural Networks
Authors: Curtis Nybo
Comments: 26 pages
Subjects: Computational Finance (q-fin.CP); Machine Learning (cs.LG)

Recently artificial neural networks (ANNs) have seen success in volatility prediction, but the literature is divided on where an ANN should be used rather than the common GARCH model. The purpose of this study is to compare the volatility prediction performance of ANN and GARCH models when applied to stocks with low, medium, and high volatility profiles. This approach intends to identify which model should be used for each case. The volatility profiles comprise of five sectors that cover all stocks in the U.S stock market from 2005 to 2020. Three GARCH specifications and three ANN architectures are examined for each sector, where the most adequate model is chosen to move on to forecasting. The results indicate that the ANN model should be used for predicting volatility of assets with low volatility profiles, and GARCH models should be used when predicting volatility of medium and high volatility assets.

Cross-lists for Tue, 19 Oct 21

[15]  arXiv:2110.08673 (cross-list from cs.CR) [pdf, other]
Title: Scaling Blockchains: Can Elected Committees Help?
Subjects: Cryptography and Security (cs.CR); Computer Science and Game Theory (cs.GT); Information Theory (cs.IT); General Economics (econ.GN); Trading and Market Microstructure (q-fin.TR)

In the high-stakes race to develop more scalable blockchains, some platforms (Cosmos, EOS, TRON, etc.) have adopted committee-based consensus protocols, whereby the blockchain's record-keeping rights are entrusted to a committee of elected block producers. In theory, the smaller the committee, the faster the blockchain can reach consensus and the more it can scale. What's less clear, is whether this mechanism ensures that honest committees can be consistently elected, given voters typically have limited information. Using EOS' Delegated Proof of Stake (DPoS) protocol as a backdrop, we show that identifying the optimal voting strategy is complex and practically out of reach. We empirically characterize some simpler (suboptimal) voting strategies that token holders resort to in practice and show that these nonetheless converge to optimality, exponentially quickly. This yields efficiency gains over other PoS protocols that rely on randomized block producer selection. Our results suggest that (elected) committee-based consensus, as implemented in DPoS, can be robust and efficient, despite its complexity.

[16]  arXiv:2110.08884 (cross-list from stat.ML) [pdf, other]
Title: Persuasion by Dimension Reduction
Comments: arXiv admin note: text overlap with arXiv:2102.10909
Subjects: Machine Learning (stat.ML); Machine Learning (cs.LG); General Economics (econ.GN); Statistics Theory (math.ST); Methodology (stat.ME)

How should an agent (the sender) observing multi-dimensional data (the state vector) persuade another agent to take the desired action? We show that it is always optimal for the sender to perform a (non-linear) dimension reduction by projecting the state vector onto a lower-dimensional object that we call the "optimal information manifold." We characterize geometric properties of this manifold and link them to the sender's preferences. Optimal policy splits information into "good" and "bad" components. When the sender's marginal utility is linear, revealing the full magnitude of good information is always optimal. In contrast, with concave marginal utility, optimal information design conceals the extreme realizations of good information and only reveals its direction (sign). We illustrate these effects by explicitly solving several multi-dimensional Bayesian persuasion problems.

[17]  arXiv:2110.09416 (cross-list from math.OC) [pdf, ps, other]
Title: Numeraire-invariant quadratic hedging and mean--variance portfolio allocation
Comments: 35 pages
Subjects: Optimization and Control (math.OC); Portfolio Management (q-fin.PM)

The paper investigates quadratic hedging in a general semimartingale market that does not necessarily contain a risk-free asset. An equivalence result for hedging with and without numeraire change is established. This permits direct computation of the optimal strategy without choosing a reference asset and/or performing a numeraire change. New explicit expressions for optimal strategies are obtained, featuring the use of oblique projections that provide unified treatment of the case with and without a risk-free asset. The main result advances our understanding of the efficient frontier formation in the most general case where a risk-free asset may not be present. Several illustrations of the numeraire-invariant approach are given.

Replacements for Tue, 19 Oct 21

[18]  arXiv:1406.6245 (replaced) [pdf, ps, other]
Title: Optimal investment with time-varying stochastic endowments
Subjects: Portfolio Management (q-fin.PM); Probability (math.PR)
[19]  arXiv:2012.00103 (replaced) [pdf, other]
Title: Rise of the Kniesians: The professor-student network of Nobel laureates in economics
Authors: Richard S.J. Tol
Subjects: General Economics (econ.GN)
[20]  arXiv:2104.14204 (replaced) [pdf, other]
Title: Optimal bidding in hourly and quarter-hourly electricity price auctions: trading large volumes of power with market impact and transaction costs
Subjects: Statistical Finance (q-fin.ST); Mathematical Finance (q-fin.MF); Portfolio Management (q-fin.PM); Trading and Market Microstructure (q-fin.TR); Applications (stat.AP)
[21]  arXiv:2108.05721 (replaced) [pdf, other]
Title: Networks of News and Cross-Sectional Returns
Comments: Revision before another submission
Subjects: Portfolio Management (q-fin.PM); Computation (stat.CO)
[ total of 21 entries: 1-21 ]
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